0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Original Investigation | Clinical Sciences

Choroidal Thickness in Patients With a History of Retinopathy of Prematurity

Wei-Chi Wu, MD, PhD1,2; Chia-Pang Shih, PhD3; Nan-Kai Wang, MD1,2; Reyin Lien, MD2,4; Yen-Po Chen, MD, PhD1,2; An-Ning Chao, MD1,2; Kuan-Jen Chen, MD1,2; Tun-Lu Chen, MD1,2; Yih-Shiou Hwang, MD1,2; Chi-Chun Lai, MD1,2; Chung-Ying Huang, MD1,2; Shawn Tsai, MD5
[+] Author Affiliations
1Department of Ophthalmology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan
2College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
3Laboratory for Epidemiology, Department of Health Care Management, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
4Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan
5Department of Ophthalmology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2013;131(11):1451-1458. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2013.5052.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Importance  The cause of reduced vision in patients with a history of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is not yet fully understood. The role of the choroid in ROP remains unknown and existing studies of choroidal thickness in patients with a history of ROP are limited. It might be helpful to understand the association of the choroid with ROP by measuring the choroidal thickness in patients with a history of ROP and correlating these findings with the visual outcome of these patients.

Objective  To examine choroidal thickness by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in children with a history of ROP and assess the impact of choroidal thickness on visual acuity.

Design  A prospective cross-sectional analysis from August 2011 to September 2012.

Setting  Institutional referral centers.

Participants  Children aged 6 to 14 years with a history of ROP were classified into the following 2 groups: patients with a history of threshold ROP and treatment with laser or cryotherapy (treated group) and those with regressed ROP who had not received any treatment (nontreated group). All of the patients had a normal-appearing posterior pole.

Intervention  Examinations of visual acuity, refractive errors, and optical components and measurement of choroidal thickness.

Main Outcomes and Measures  Best-corrected visual acuity, optical components, and optical coherence tomography findings.

Results  In total, 49 patients were enrolled in the study. Patients in the treated group had a significantly thinner choroidal thickness than the patients in the nontreated group after adjusting for age, axial length, and spherical power. Choroidal thickness was found to be positively associated with spherical power and spherical equivalent and negatively associated with axial length and vitreous depth. In addition, a thin choroidal thickness was associated with a worse best-corrected visual acuity.

Conclusions and Relevance  Choroidal thickness is thinner in patients with threshold ROP compared with the patients with spontaneously regressed ROP. A thinner choroid is associated with worse vision in these patients. This study might imply the association of choroid circulation with ROP.

Figures in this Article

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 1.
Measurement of Macular and Subfoveal Choroidal Thickness

Macular choroidal thickness, an averaged value from 14 choroidal thickness readings, made at 1000-µm intervals from the fovea to a distance of 3 mm in the nasal, temporal, superior, and inferior directions, represents the generalized choroidal thickness in the macula area. Subfoveal choroidal thickness, on the other hand, measures only the region of subfoveal choroidal thickness.

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 2.
Representative Choroidal Thickness Obtained by Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Patients With History of Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP)

In the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography analysis, macular choroidal thickness (within red lines) was thinner in patients with a history of threshold ROP (treated group) than the patients with a history of ROP and spontaneous regression (nontreated group). GCL indicates ganglion cell layer; INL, inner nuclear layer; IPL, inner plexiform layer; NFL, nerve fiber layer; ONL, outer nuclear layer; OPL, outer plexiform layer; and RPE, retinal pigment epithelium.

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 3.
Correlation of Macular Choroidal Thickness (MCT) With Refractive Errors and Optical Components

Macular choroidal thickness is positively associated with spherical power and spherical equivalent and negatively associated with foveal thickness, axial length, and vitreous depth. D indicates diopter.

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 4.
Predictive Power of Choroidal Thickness on the Patients’ Vision in the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve

Areas under the curve of macular choroidal thickness and subfoveal choroidal thickness are 0.69 and 0.71, respectively.

Graphic Jump Location

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Topics
Jobs
brightcove.createExperiences();