0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Special Communication |

Challenges of Ophthalmic Care in the Developing World

Alfred Sommer, MD1,2; Hugh R. Taylor, AC, MD3; Thulasiraj D. Ravilla, MBA4; Sheila West, PhD1,2; Thomas M. Lietman, MD6,7; Jeremy D. Keenan, MD, MPH6,7; Michael F. Chiang, MD8,9; Alan L. Robin, MD5; Richard P. Mills, MD, MPH10 ; for the Council of the American Ophthalmological Society
[+] Author Affiliations
1Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
2Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
3Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
4LAICO, Aravind Eye Care System, Madurai, India
5Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
6Francis I. Proctor Foundation, University of California, San Francisco
7Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco
8Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, Oregon
9Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, Oregon
10University of Washington Eye Institute, Seattle
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014;132(5):640-644. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2014.84.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Global blindness exacts an enormous financial and social cost on developing countries. Reducing the prevalence of blindness globally requires a set of strategies that are different from those typically used in developed countries. This was the subject of the 2013 Knapp symposium at the American Ophthalmological Society Annual Meeting, and this article summarizes the presentations of epidemiologists, health care planners, and ophthalmologists. It explores a range of successful strategies from the multinational Vision 2020 Initiative to disease-specific schemes in cataract, trachoma control, infectious corneal ulceration, cytomegalovirus retinitis, and retinopathy of prematurity. In each example, the importance of an attitudinal change set toward public health becomes clear. There is reason for optimism in the struggle against global blindness in large measure because of innovative programs such as those described here.

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Figures

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
PubMed Articles
Vision 2020 - the right to sight. Ann Trop Med Parasitol 2008;102 Suppl 1():3-5.
Challenges of ophthalmic care in the developing world. JAMA Ophthalmol 2014;132(5):640-4.
Jobs
brightcove.createExperiences();