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Comment & Response |

Women in Print—Reply

Irena Tsui, MD1; Jamie B. Rosenberg, MD2; Valentina Franco-Cardenas, MD3
[+] Author Affiliations
1Stein Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California
2Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York
3Association to Prevent Blindness in Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2015;133(5):621. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2015.223.
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In Reply We thank Davis and colleagues for their interest in our article about publication trends in ophthalmology during the past decade and for directing us to read their recently published work. While we wholeheartedly agree that these are important topics, we view the 2 issues as being distinct and would like to address them separately.

As quoted in their “Gender and Uveitis” editorial in the special issue of Journal of Ophthalmology, the World Health Organization website says, “In every region of the world and at all ages, females have a significantly higher risk of being visually impaired.”1 The 10 articles that follow further enlighten readers in gender differences related to uveitic diseases such as multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, and Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, to name a few. The issue has set an important precedent and it would be beneficial to expand our knowledge of other gender-related eye diseases such as toxemia of pregnancy, macular holes, and vitreomacular traction syndrome. Furthermore, we ponder the global impact that education, domestic violence, and socioeconomic class have on women and blindness in developing countries.

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May 1, 2015
Janet L. Davis, MD; Chi-Chao Chan, MD; Debra A. Goldstein, MD, FRCSC
1Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
2Histology Core, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland3Immunopathology Section, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
4Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2015;133(5):620-621. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2015.221.
March 1, 2015
Valentina Franco-Cardenas, MD; Jamie Rosenberg, MD; Adriana Ramirez, MD; Juan Lin, PhD; Irena Tsui, MD
1Retina Division, Jules Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California2currently with the Retina Department, Association to Prevent Blindness in Mexico, Mexico City
3Department of Ophthalmology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
1Retina Division, Jules Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California
4Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2015;133(3):255-260. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2014.4447.
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