0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Obituary |

Bernard Schwartz, MD, PhD (1927-2007) FREE

John W. Gittinger Jr, MD
Arch Ophthalmol. 2008;126(8):1171. doi:10.1001/archopht.126.8.1171.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Bernie Schwartz died of a rapidly progressive malignancy in Boston, November 10, 2007, just a few days shy of his 80th birthday. He was born in Toronto, Canada, and received his medical degree from the University of Toronto. He then moved to Iowa City for his internship, ophthalmology residency, and a PhD in physiology. Remarkably, considering the campus was in rural Iowa, he felt his training there gave him a global perspective, crediting the European influences of Drs H. M. Burian and Frederick C. Blodi. He also expressed admiration for his mentor Placidus J. Leinfelder, MD, for his ability to be both a skilled clinician and a basic science researcher and considered the integration of the clinical and basic science departments on the same campus “a fundamental stimulus” for his own career.1

Place holder to copy figure label and caption

Bernard Schwartz, MD, PhD

Graphic Jump Location

He was on the full-time faculty of the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center for 8 years before moving to Boston to become professor and chair of Tufts University School of Medicine's Department of Ophthalmology in July of 1968. He was proud that he “developed a full-time academic department of ophthalmology where none had existed previously, including medical student, residency and fellowship training programs.”1 He retired from his chairmanship in 1990 but remained active professionally up until his brief, final illness. At the time of his death, he had 3 papers being considered for publication.

He served as editor in chief of the Survey of Ophthalmology from 1967 until his death, transforming the publication into an “international review journal” that is widely read and cited. In 2000 he founded Comprehensive Ophthalmology Update and was its editor in chief and publisher.

Dr Schwartz's first research interest was in the physiology of the crystalline lens, but he soon turned his research and clinical focus to glaucoma. He studied the ocular hypertensive effects of corticosteroids and postulated that there were defects in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in patients with glaucoma. By the time I joined the faculty at Tufts in 1977, he was doing pioneering work on imaging of the glaucomatous optic disc, with 6 articles on this subject published in that year alone. He received the Presidential Award of the American Glaucoma Society in March 2007.

In addition to being a physician and surgeon—with a legendary sangfroid in the operating room—Dr Schwartz was a gentleman and a scholar. He inspired his associates and trainees and supported their professional development. He traveled widely and lectured and published all over the world. Many of his fellows came from outside the United States, a product of what he liked to call his “international approach.”1 He is survived by his wife Marcia (née Struhl) and his children, Ariane, Jennifer, Karen, and Lawrence.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Correspondence: Dr Gittinger, 85 E Concord St, Eighth Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (john.gittinger@bmc.org).

REFERENCES

Schwartz  BOphthalmology at Tufts 1968-1990: More Than Two Decades of Unification and Progress. Boston, MA Stellar Medical Publications1999;

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption

Bernard Schwartz, MD, PhD

Graphic Jump Location

Tables

References

Schwartz  BOphthalmology at Tufts 1968-1990: More Than Two Decades of Unification and Progress. Boston, MA Stellar Medical Publications1999;

Correspondence

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

359 Views
0 Citations
×

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Jobs