0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Research Letters |

Genotype at Polymorphism rs11200638 and HTRA1 Expression Level FREE

Gaofeng Wang, PhD; William K. Scott, PhD; Jonathan L. Haines, PhD; Margaret A. Pericak-Vance, PhD
[+] Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, Dr John T. Macdonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (Drs Wang, Scott, and Pericak-Vance); and Center for Human Genetics Research, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (Dr Haines).


Arch Ophthalmol. 2010;128(11):1491-1493. doi:10.1001/archophthalmol.2010.256.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Genetic factors strongly contribute to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The loci at chromosomes 1q32 and 10q26 have been repeatedly and consistently linked to the disease. Compared with the successful discovery of the first AMD susceptibility gene CFH at the chromosome 1q32 locus, it has been difficult to identify with certainty the susceptibility variation(s) responsible for linkage and association at the chromosome 10q26 locus. One major reason for the inconclusive findings is that the polymorphisms in genes ARMS2 and HTRA1 are in such strong linkage disequilibrium that their effects are indistinguishable using statistical analysis. HTRA1 was proposed as the susceptibility gene, partly based on the result that the risk allele (A) of the polymorphism rs11200638, which is strongly associated with AMD, was reportedly correlated with a higher level of HTRA1 in lymphocytes and retinal pigment epithelium.1,2 However, this result remains controversial.3,4 We therefore conducted this study to test whether the genotype at rs11200638 is correlated with HTRA1 expression in peripheral blood and retina.

Retinal tissues (including retina, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid) were punched from the macula of fresh frozen eyes retrieved within 24 hours of death from 24 unrelated white subjects (mean [SD] age, 76.4 [14.5] years) without any known eye diseases, and RNA was extracted with the RNeasy lipid tissue kit (Qiagen Inc, Valencia, California). The RNA was also extracted from whole blood samples of 52 white subjects including 46 cases (mean [SD] age, 79.0 [7.5] years; 50% female) and 6 controls (mean [SD] age, 72.7 [10.5] years; 67% female) using the PAXgene Blood RNA System Kit (PreAnalytiX, Venlo, the Netherlands). Procedures for recruitment, requests for medical records, and consent forms were approved by the University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine Institutional Review Board. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed using an ABI HP7900 (Applied Biosystems, Carlsbad, California). Each sample was repeated 3 times at different locations in the plate. After the polymerase chain reaction run was complete, quantitative gene expression data were acquired and analyzed using the ABI Prism 7900HT Sequence Detection System (RQ manager) (Applied Biosystems). The overall experiment was repeated twice. The t test was applied to compare the difference in the HTRA1 level between the genotypes at rs11200638.

The genotype at rs11200638 of all eye tissue samples was obtained by applying the Taqman assay (Applied Biosystems). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed no significant difference in the retinal HTRA1 messenger RNA (mRNA) level between 17 GG samples and 7 GA samples (P = .38) (Figure 1). To compensate for the lack of homozygous risk allele A and the lack of AMD-affected samples, we applied quantitative polymerase chain reaction on RNA samples extracted from peripheral white blood cells. The RNA was extracted from 52 samples that included 26 GG genotypes, 6 AA genotypes, and 20 heterozygous GA samples at rs11200638. No significant difference in the HTRA1 mRNA level was found between the different genotypes at rs11200638 (P = .28) (Figure 2A). No significant difference of the HTRA1 mRNA level was detected between AMD-affected samples and controls either (P = .35) (Figure 2B).

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 1.

The genotype at polymorphism rs11200638 is not correlated with the HTRA1 expression level in human retina. Error bars indicate standard error.

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 2.

The genotype at polymorphism rs11200638 is not correlated with the HTRA1 expression level in human peripheral blood cells (A), and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)–affected status is not correlated with HTRA1 expression (B). Error bars indicate standard error.

Graphic Jump Location

Polymorphism rs11200638 is located in a predicted HTRA1 promoter region. The risk allele of rs11200638 reportedly correlates with a higher level of HTRA1 mRNA and protein in retina.1,5,6 Paradoxically, data have shown that the genotype at rs11200638 is not correlated with the HTRA1 expression level in human retina and white blood cells,3,4 leading to ongoing controversy. Here we further confirm that there are no effects of rs11200638 genotype on HTRA1 expression. We propose that rs11200638 is not likely a functional variant underlying genetic association with AMD, suggesting that potential functional variants such as rs10490924 (Ala69Ser change) in ARMS2 should be the focus of further experiments regarding the susceptibility gene for AMD.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Correspondence: Dr Wang, Dr John T. Macdonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1501 NW 10th Ave, Miami, FL 33136 (gwang@med.miami.edu).

Financial Disclosure: Drs Scott, Haines, and Pericak-Vance own a patent licensed by ArcticDx for the use of genetics in AMD diagnosis.

Funding/Support: This research was supported by grant EY12118 from the National Institutes of Health (Drs Haines and Pericak-Vance).

Additional Information: A subset of the participants was ascertained while Dr Pericak-Vance was a faculty member at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Additional Contributions: We thank all the patients, their families, and the controls who participated in the study.

Yang  ZCamp  NJSun  H  et al.  A variant of the HTRA1 gene increases susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration. Science 2006;314 (5801) 992- 993
PubMed Link to Article
Dewan  ALiu  MHartman  S  et al.  HTRA1 promoter polymorphism in wet age-related macular degeneration. Science 2006;314 (5801) 989- 992
PubMed Link to Article
Kanda  AChen  WOthman  M  et al.  A variant of mitochondrial protein LOC387715/ARMS2, not HTRA1, is strongly associated with age-related macular degeneration. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2007;104 (41) 16227- 16232
PubMed Link to Article
Chowers  IMeir  TLederman  M  et al.  Sequence variants in HTRA1 and LOC387715/ARMS2 and phenotype and response to photodynamic therapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration in populations from Israel. Mol Vis 2008;142263- 2271
PubMed
Chan  CCShen  DZhou  M  et al.  Human HtrA1 in the archived eyes with age-related macular degeneration. Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc 2007;10592- 97, discussion 97-98
PubMed
Tuo  JRoss  RJReed  GF  et al.  The HtrA1 promoter polymorphism, smoking, and age-related macular degeneration in multiple case-control samples. Ophthalmology 2008;115 (11) 1891- 1898
PubMed Link to Article

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 1.

The genotype at polymorphism rs11200638 is not correlated with the HTRA1 expression level in human retina. Error bars indicate standard error.

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 2.

The genotype at polymorphism rs11200638 is not correlated with the HTRA1 expression level in human peripheral blood cells (A), and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)–affected status is not correlated with HTRA1 expression (B). Error bars indicate standard error.

Graphic Jump Location

Tables

References

Yang  ZCamp  NJSun  H  et al.  A variant of the HTRA1 gene increases susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration. Science 2006;314 (5801) 992- 993
PubMed Link to Article
Dewan  ALiu  MHartman  S  et al.  HTRA1 promoter polymorphism in wet age-related macular degeneration. Science 2006;314 (5801) 989- 992
PubMed Link to Article
Kanda  AChen  WOthman  M  et al.  A variant of mitochondrial protein LOC387715/ARMS2, not HTRA1, is strongly associated with age-related macular degeneration. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2007;104 (41) 16227- 16232
PubMed Link to Article
Chowers  IMeir  TLederman  M  et al.  Sequence variants in HTRA1 and LOC387715/ARMS2 and phenotype and response to photodynamic therapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration in populations from Israel. Mol Vis 2008;142263- 2271
PubMed
Chan  CCShen  DZhou  M  et al.  Human HtrA1 in the archived eyes with age-related macular degeneration. Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc 2007;10592- 97, discussion 97-98
PubMed
Tuo  JRoss  RJReed  GF  et al.  The HtrA1 promoter polymorphism, smoking, and age-related macular degeneration in multiple case-control samples. Ophthalmology 2008;115 (11) 1891- 1898
PubMed Link to Article

Correspondence

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

835 Views
7 Citations
×

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
PubMed Articles
Jobs