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Research Letters |

Central Corneal Thickness and Optic Disc Hemorrhages: The Beijing Eye Study FREE

Liang Xu, MD; Haitao Zhang, MD; Ya Xing Wang, MD; Jost B. Jonas, MD
Arch Ophthalmol. 2008;126(3):435-436. doi:10.1001/archopht.126.3.435.
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Central corneal thickness (CCT) has been described to be a predictor for the development of primary open-angle glaucoma and the progression of glaucomatous visual field defects in the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study1 and other investigations.2,3 Correspondingly, a previous investigation by Herndon and colleagues3 found that CCT was the most consistent predictor of the degree of glaucomatous damage in their hospital-based cross-sectional study. However, CCT also influences applanation tonometry, so it has remained unclear whether the reported findings are due to the dependence of intraocular pressure measurements on CCT and a corresponding selection artifact of patients or whether a thin cornea may predispose the eye to a higher glaucoma susceptibility. Since optic disc hemorrhages can indicate progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy and because most of the previous investigations were hospital-based studies with a possible referral bias, it was the purpose of our population-based study to assess whether CCT influences the development of disc hemorrhages.

The Beijing Eye Study is a population-based cohort study in northern China.4 The medical ethics committee of the Beijing Tongren Hospital approved the study protocol and all of the participants gave informed consent according to the Declaration of Helsinki. Of 5324 individuals aged 40 years or older residing in the study area, 4439 individuals (2505 women) participated in the eye examination (response rate, 83.4%) in the year 2001 as described in detail previously.4 In 2006, the same population was invited for a reexamination, with 3251 subjects participating (response rate, 73.3%). All of the participants underwent a standardized ophthalmic examination including CCT measurement by slitlamp optical coherence tomography. Only 1 randomly selected eye was taken for statistical analysis. Glaucoma was defined by the appearance of the optic nerve head as described recently (Table).4

Table Graphic Jump LocationTable. Criteria for the Definition of Glaucoma in the Beijing Eye Studya

Of the 3251 subjects, CCT measurements were available for 3100 subjects (95.4%); 32 of them (1.0%) showed an optic disc hemorrhage. The CCT was slightly greater in the hemorrhagic group (mean [SD] CCT, 569 .5 [33.8] μm) than in the nonhemorrhagic group (mean [SD] CCT, 556 .0 [33.0] μm) (P = .03; after application of the Bonferroni method to correct for performing multiple statistical analyses, P = .06) (Figure). Including glaucomatous eyes (n = 77) only, the CCT did not vary significantly between the hemorrhagic group (n = 5 eyes [6%]; mean [SD] CCT, 571.8[36.1] μm) and the nonhemorrhagic group (n = 72 eyes [94%]; mean [SD] CCT, 549.3 [31.4] μm) (P = .24), with the hemorrhagic group having slightly thicker corneas than the nonhemorrhagic group.

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure.

Box plots showing the distribution of central corneal thickness in subjects with and without optic disc hemorrhages in the Beijing Eye Study. Open circles indicate outliers. The box contains 50% of the data; the line in the box represents the median.

Graphic Jump Location

The findings point against a thin cornea as an associated factor for disc hemorrhages in glaucoma.5,6 Because disc hemorrhages are usually associated with glaucoma progression, the results do not support a thin cornea to be a pathogenic risk factor for glaucoma progression.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Correspondence: Dr Jonas, Universitäts-Augenklinik, Theodor -Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim, Germany (jost.jonas@augen.ma.uni-heidelberg.de).

Financial Disclosure: None reported.

Funding/Support: This work was supported by grant 7071003 from the Beijing Natural Science Foundation.

Gordon  MOBeiser  JABrandt  JD  et al.  The Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study: baseline factors that predict the onset of primary open-angle glaucoma. Arch Ophthalmol 2002;120 (6) 714- 720
PubMed Link to Article
Medeiros  FASample  PAWeinreb  RN Corneal thickness measurements and frequency doubling technology perimetry abnormalities in ocular hypertensive eyes. Ophthalmology 2003;110 (10) 1903- 1908
PubMed Link to Article
Herndon  LWWeizer  JSStinnett  SS Central corneal thickness as a risk factor for advanced glaucoma damage. Arch Ophthalmol 2004;122 (1) 17- 21
PubMed Link to Article
Xu  LWang  YWang  SWang  YJonas  JB High myopia and glaucoma susceptibility: the Beijing Eye Study. Ophthalmology 2007;114 (2) 216- 220
PubMed Link to Article
Leske  MCHeijl  AHussein  MBengtsson  BHyman  LKomaroff  EEarly Manifest Glaucoma Trial Group, Factors for glaucoma progression and the effect of treatment: the Early Manifest Glaucoma Trial. Arch Ophthalmol 2003;121 (1) 48- 56
PubMed Link to Article
Chauhan  BCHutchison  DMLeBlanc  RPArtes  PHNicolela  MT Central corneal thickness and progression of the visual field and optic disc in glaucoma. Br J Ophthalmol 2005;89 (8) 1008- 1012
PubMed Link to Article

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure.

Box plots showing the distribution of central corneal thickness in subjects with and without optic disc hemorrhages in the Beijing Eye Study. Open circles indicate outliers. The box contains 50% of the data; the line in the box represents the median.

Graphic Jump Location

Tables

Table Graphic Jump LocationTable. Criteria for the Definition of Glaucoma in the Beijing Eye Studya

References

Gordon  MOBeiser  JABrandt  JD  et al.  The Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study: baseline factors that predict the onset of primary open-angle glaucoma. Arch Ophthalmol 2002;120 (6) 714- 720
PubMed Link to Article
Medeiros  FASample  PAWeinreb  RN Corneal thickness measurements and frequency doubling technology perimetry abnormalities in ocular hypertensive eyes. Ophthalmology 2003;110 (10) 1903- 1908
PubMed Link to Article
Herndon  LWWeizer  JSStinnett  SS Central corneal thickness as a risk factor for advanced glaucoma damage. Arch Ophthalmol 2004;122 (1) 17- 21
PubMed Link to Article
Xu  LWang  YWang  SWang  YJonas  JB High myopia and glaucoma susceptibility: the Beijing Eye Study. Ophthalmology 2007;114 (2) 216- 220
PubMed Link to Article
Leske  MCHeijl  AHussein  MBengtsson  BHyman  LKomaroff  EEarly Manifest Glaucoma Trial Group, Factors for glaucoma progression and the effect of treatment: the Early Manifest Glaucoma Trial. Arch Ophthalmol 2003;121 (1) 48- 56
PubMed Link to Article
Chauhan  BCHutchison  DMLeBlanc  RPArtes  PHNicolela  MT Central corneal thickness and progression of the visual field and optic disc in glaucoma. Br J Ophthalmol 2005;89 (8) 1008- 1012
PubMed Link to Article

Correspondence

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